Not “Horsing Around”: Brad Johnson and Third Branch Horse Logging

Educational Resources Archives - Vermont Woodlands Association

Member Profile – Stonehenge in Vermont: Jock Irons

Active VWA members and Tree Farmers come in all shapes and sizes, just like their woods. For this issue, we peek in on VWA member and Tree Farmer Jock Irons. Jock was born and raised in Bennington, where he stayed until he finished college. Then he moved to Alaska, where he stayed until moving back

Read More...

Managing for the Birds at the Catamount Community Forest

by Ethan Tapper, Chittenden County Forester We will be moving forward with some wildlife habitat management work in late December or early January at the Catamount Community Forest in Williston. This will consist of using a “brontosaurus” (a grinder head mounted on an excavator) to grind and fell trees in two areas of the CCF,

Read More...

Andrews Community Forest Update

by Ethan Tapper  While the weather is slowing us down, we’ve been able to make this process, and logs are starting to pile up on the “log landing.” A log landing, also called a “landing,” “log yard” or “header” is generally an open flat area, accessible by log trucks. On the landing, trees are cut

Read More...

Novel canine scent detection program holds promise in PA’s fight against Spotted Lanternfly

A new pilot training program from the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet) points to a promising solution in Pennsylvania’s efforts to thwart the Spotted Lanternfly. By utilizing scent detection dogs to identify Spotted Lanternfly egg masses, Penn Vet researchers hope to proactively neutralize the destructive insects before they become a fully realized

Read More...

ARS scientists seek answers from Spotted Lanternfly dispersal

WASHINGTON — The black spots and beautiful colors can be deceiving. At first glance, the Spotted Lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) is a beautiful insect whose colors mimic the beloved ladybug with its polka-dotted outer wings and red hind wing. But this is not the family-friendly insect that people love to see crawling on their wrist or

Read More...

Secret weapon to stop invasive honeysuckle: Satellites

One common invasive species is so widespread that you can see it from space. The University of Cincinnati found that satellite imagery can identify nonnative and invasive Amur honeysuckle, an ornamental shrub introduced from Asia that has spread in forests across much of the United States. READ MORE [photo by Denis Conover]

Read More...

Can Vermont’s Forests Help Save the Planet?

The Cold Hollow Carbon project in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom is the first co-op model in the country to successfully enter a voluntary carbon market. By Christine McGowan, Forest Products Program Director at Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund   Long valued for timber, recreation, wildlife habitat, and solace, Vermont’s forests are being recognized for providing another, more

Read More...

In a warming world, New England’s trees are storing more carbon

by Clarisse Hart, The Harvard Gazette Climate change has increased the productivity of forests, according to a new study that synthesizes hundreds of thousands of carbon observations collected over the last quarter century at the Harvard Forest Long-Term Ecological Research site, one of the most intensively studied forests in the world. The study, published today

Read More...

Delineating tree crowns using unmanned aerial imagery

Finding is important for precision forestry, natural resource management DURHAM, N.H. — In a new study, University of New Hampshire researchers have concluded that when assessing forest imagery collected by unmanned aerial systems, an alternative method of delineating individual forest tree crowns within those images is more accurate than the most commonly used method, the

Read More...