New detections of EAB

Consulting Foresters Topics Archives - Page 2 of 3 - Vermont Woodlands Association

New detections of EAB

New detections of the emerald ash borer (EAB) in Plainfield, VT have expanded the current infested area in Central Vermont. In addition, two new detections in Sullivan County NH (Plainfield and Langdon) create infested areas that extend into Vermont. The mapped area in Vermont to which “Slow-the-Spread” recommendations  apply now includes new areas in Washington, Windsor, and Windham counties. Towns

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Vermont 2019 Forest Insect and Disease Conditions Report

The 2019 Forest Insect & Disease Conditions in Vermont has been posted HERE. This is our detailed report with maps showing results of aerial detection and invasive pest surveys, ground survey data summaries, and a comprehensive list of tree health problems that were reported to us last year. A printed version will also be available in the

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Use Value Appraisal: Interpretation of the “20% Rules” for Open Idle/Ag land, Site IV lands, and Ecologically Significant Treatment Areas (ESTA)

Use Value Appraisal: Interpretation of the “20% Rules” for Open Idle/Ag land, Site IV lands, and Ecologically Significant Treatment Areas (ESTA) Approved by Commissioner Snyder October 23, 2019 Background: In all cases, parcels enrolled in the Forestry Program of Use Value Appraisal (UVA) must have a minimum of 25 acres enrolled of which at least

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Consulting Forester Continuing Education and Licensing

Vermont Woodlands is a supporter of forester licensing. Any person holding himself or herself out to the public as a forester must be licensed. 26 V.S.A. § 5203(a)(4). And regardless of title, any person practicing forestry must be licensed. Id. § 5203(a)(3). Read the rules governing forester licensing here. The Secretary of State’s website provides a

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Northern Long-Eared Bat, Final Ruling

Final Ruling on the Northern Long-Eared Bat Summary The northern long-eared bat population has been devastated by the White Nose Syndrome (WNS) throughout the eastern United States. This disease has caused a mortality rate of up to a 90-100% where present. As a result, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has listed the northern

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Workers’ Comp for Loggers

New safety program to help loggers and reduce workers’ comp Governor Phil Scott today announced a new initiative to address the high cost of workers’ compensation insurance for logging contractors in Vermont’s forest economy. The Vermont Logger Safety and Workers’ Compensation Insurance Program—developed collaboratively by the Departments of Financial Regulation, Labor and Forests, Parks and

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Book Review: Solar Cycle Lumber Kiln

For those of you with sawmills, or who hire someone to do custom sawing for you, sawing is just the first step in turning logs into quality lumber.  The boards have to be stickered, dried, and stored under cover.  One of the ways to increase the income from sawn lumber, especially hardwood lumber, is to

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Book Review: Full Value Forestry

Many of us have complained that the main obstacle to successful forest management is the lack of a market for low quality wood.  Jim  Birkemeier, a forester/woodland owner/wood processor in Wisconsin feels that he has the answer for himself.  He has adopted what economists call vertical integration, in that he engages in every step of

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Loss of Undeveloped Woodland in VT

New Report Highlights Loss of Undeveloped Woodland in VT A new report by the Vermont Natural Resources Council (VNRC) highlights the increasing loss of undeveloped woodland tracts in Vermont through parcelization, the breaking up of land into smaller and smaller parcels. The phenomenon of parcelization, which usually occurs through subdivision, is gaining momentum, and subsequent

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Book Review: Identifying Ferns the Easy Way

Lynn Levine. Identifying Ferns the Easy Way: A Pocket Guide to Common Ferns of the Northeast. Abington,Va: Heartwood Press, 2019. 24 Pp. $10.95. How many times have you walked in your woods and, seeing a fern, thought: “I wish I knew what that fern is called.”  Now author Lynn Levine and illustrator Briony Morrow-Cribs have

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